https://reneweconomy.com.au/agl-sets-new-storage-benchmark-with-1000mwh-big-battery-in-south-australia-30655/

https://reneweconomy.com.au/agl-sets-new-storage-benchmark-with-1000mwh-big-battery-in-south-australia-30655/

Renew Economy Giles Parkinson 14 ovember 2020 – AGL, the country’s biggest coal generator and biggest polluter, on Saturday a announced that it is to build a massive 250MW big battery in South Australia, with four hours of storage, making it the longest duration big battery to be built in Australia. Importantly, the 250MW, 1000MWh battery will be built at the site of the ageing Torrens Island gas generator, which is to due to close within a few years once a new transmission link in built from South Australia to NSW, and as more renewables and grid-scale batteries displace gas generation in the supply of bulk energy and key grid services. The significance of this battery is the four hours of storage, the first in Australia, which suggests that AGL now sees batteries as competitive with gas generators to meet peak demand periods, and to operate primarily to shift the supply of wind and solar to when it is needed most. Other batteries – such as the original Tesla big battery at Hornsdale, and the newly unveiled Victorian big battery near Geelong – have focused on providing grid services, so only require a short duration in storage. The big battery at Torrens Island is just the latest in a series of important big battery announcements around the country, including the bigger (but shorter duration) 300MW/450MW Victorian big battery, two new batteries in Canberra, and NSW government support for four new big batteries in that state. The Northern Territory has also started the tender for the Darwin big battery, which will also displace gas generation. AGL plans to roll out 850MW of energy storage across the National Electricity Market by 2023/24, which includes its previously announced 200MW of big battery installations with two hours storage with Maoneng, a 100MW/150MWh battery at Wandoan in Queensland, and a big battery – possibly as big as 500MW – at the soon to be closed Liddell coal fired power station “With more renewable generation than any other state, South Australia has been a leading contributor to Australia’s low-emissions future,” AGL chief executive Brett Redman said in a statement. (South Australia leads the world with 57 per cent contribution from wind and solar in the last 12 months, and the state Liberal government has a target of net 100 per cent renewables by 2030, which the state is likely to reach well before then). “Wind generation is a major source of energy in South Australia and to ensure its reliability AGL is committed to delivering more firming capacity, last year opening the AGL Barker Inlet Power Station (a fast start generator featuring multiple small units also located at Torrens Island, about 18kms from the Adelaide CBD). “This battery is another step in the state’s energy transition while...

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Victoria fast-tracks rooftop solar and battery rollout, part of $800m energy savings package

Victoria fast-tracks rooftop solar and battery rollout, part of $800m energy savings package

Renew Economy Sophie Vorath 17 November 2020 – The Victorian government has unveiled a massive nearly $800 million home energy saving package that will incentivise smart appliances and heating systems, boost the energy efficiency standards of new and existing homes, and expand the state’s solar and battery rebate scheme. The significant new policy suite was announced on Tuesday, ahead of next week’s delivery of the state’s “Covid” budget that will lay the groundwork for the state’s economic recovery from a months-long shut down in response to the Coronavirus. Energy minister for the Andrews Labor government, Lily D’Ambrosio, said in a statement that an investment of $797 million would help Victorians cover the cost of their “working-from-home” affected power bills while laying the foundations to make homes more energy efficient in the future. In immediate terms, the package offers a one-off $250 “direct bill relief” payment towards energy costs for eligible concession card holders, including anyone receiving JobSeeker, youth allowance or pension payments. More impressive, however, are the long-term measures the Andrews government is putting in place to drive down energy consumption across Australian households and to ensure comfortable and healthy living conditions for all, rather than just those who can afford it. To this end, the package includes a $14 million expansion of the state’s existing Victorian Energy Upgrades program, to allow “every single Victorian household” to access rebates for more energy efficient appliances. Another $335 million will fund the replacement of old wood, electric or gas-fired heaters with new energy-efficient systems for low-income earners – an initiative that D’Ambrosio says will save 250,000 households between $300 to $900 a year on their energy bills. And a further $112 million allocation will go towards sealing windows and doors, and upgrading heating, cooling and hot water in 35,000 social housing properties. Funding will also be used to introduce minimum efficiency standards for rental properties – identified as some of the most thermally inefficient housing stock in the state – and to put Victoria on track for a minimum 7-star efficiency standards for all new homes. Also on the agenda is a $191 million expansion of the government’s Solar Homes program, which will see a further 42,000 rebates offered in the popular scheme, meaning a total of 140,000 households will be able to install solar panels on their roof at no upfront cost over next two years. The state’s discounted solar offering is also being opened up to small businesses for the first time, with a total of 15,000 solar rebates being put up for grabs. And finally the government appears to have opened the state’s home battery rebate to “Victorians in every corner of the state” – it has previously...

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NSW renewable energy plan seals death warrant for six gigawatts of coal

NSW renewable energy plan seals death warrant for six gigawatts of coal

Renew Economy David Leitch & Ben Willacy 15 November 2020  The NSW Liberal government’s announcement for its renewable energy growth plans seals the death warrant for about 6 gigawatts of coal capacity, and is very bad news for the owners of the same. By 2030, we expect around 6GW of currently operating coal generation will be surplus to requirements. Exactly which generators will close and how soon will depend on competition. In ITK’s main model we have, in previous runs, constrained NSW coal generation to a minimum of 2GW up to 2030. That seemed academic a couple of years ago, but is a live issue now. In short, if we continue to constrain NSW to have minimum coal generation then all the brown coal generators in Victoria will be in deep trouble. On our numbers all three would be faced with unachievable ramp issues by 2030, which perhaps a battery could help with in theory, but capex likely not justifiable. In that scenario we think it very likely Yallourn will close around 2025. If, alternatively, we dispatch entirely on merit order, that is lowest variable cost to highest, then it’s the higher cost black coal generators in NSW that bear the pain. In practice, the reality is that neither AGL or Origin will allow Bayswater or Eraring to run down towards zero every day. They will most likely see that by taking short-term losses they can force Yallourn out of the market. Caveat: Its also important to note that we have not considered inertia, frequency, voltage and system stability in this analysis. To the extent that AEMO, and the AEMC still don’t have processes in place to ensure those system services can be provided by 21st century technology (read batteries and virtual synchronous machines) then it may be that AEMO will constrain wind and solar off if leaving it on makes coal generation likely to close.  We know the answers to this problem but the NSW announcement ups the ante again for rulemakers. State Governments wouldn’t be doing all this stuff if the Federal Government had made policy and if the AEMC had been more forward looking. Nature abhors a vacuum. Flat load prices $15/MWH lower by 2030 compared to prior estimates We expect prices to fall around $15/MWh compared to our prior forecast as a result of the NSW announcement although mostly towards the end of the decade. We do expect volatility around the coal generation closures and offer a ray of hope in that the low prices may be enough to keep things like aluminium smelters running. Thumbs down to AGL, CLP and ORG as investments Nevertheless what we are left with is the losers. They are...

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AGL sets new storage benchmark with 1,000MWh big battery in South Australia

AGL sets new storage benchmark with 1,000MWh big battery in South Australia

Renew Economy Giles Parkinson 14 November 2020 – AGL, the country’s biggest coal generator and biggest polluter, on Saturday a announced that it is to build a massive 250MW big battery in South Australia, with four hours of storage, making it the longest duration big battery to be built in Australia. Importantly, the 250MW, 1000MWh battery will be built at the site of the ageing Torrens Island gas generator, which is to due to close within a few years once a new transmission link in built from South Australia to NSW, and as more renewables and grid-scale batteries displace gas generation in the supply of bulk energy and key grid services. The significance of this battery is the four hours of storage, the first in Australia, which suggests that AGL now sees batteries as competitive with gas generators to meet peak demand periods, and to operate primarily to shift the supply of wind and solar to when it is needed most. Other batteries – such as the original Tesla big battery at Hornsdale, and the newly unveiled Victorian big battery near Geelong – have focused on providing grid services, so only require a short duration in storage. The big battery at Torrens Island is just the latest in a series of important big battery announcements around the country, including the bigger (but shorter duration) 300MW/450MW Victorian big battery, two new batteries in Canberra, and NSW government support for four new big batteries in that state. The Northern Territory has also started the tender for the Darwin big battery, which will also displace gas generation. AGL plans to roll out 850MW of energy storage across the National Electricity Market by 2023/24, which includes its previously announced 200MW of big battery installations with two hours storage with Maoneng, a 100MW/150MWh battery at Wandoan in Queensland, and a big battery – possibly as big as 500MW – at the soon to be closed Liddell coal fired power station “With more renewable generation than any other state, South Australia has been a leading contributor to Australia’s low-emissions future,” AGL chief executive Brett Redman said in a statement. (South Australia leads the world with 57 per cent contribution from wind and solar in the last 12 months, and the state Liberal government has a target of net 100 per cent renewables by 2030, which the state is likely to reach well before then). “Wind generation is a major source of energy in South Australia and to ensure its reliability AGL is committed to delivering more firming capacity, last year opening the AGL Barker Inlet Power Station (a fast start generator featuring multiple small units also located at Torrens Island, about 18kms from the Adelaide CBD). “This battery is another step in the state’s energy transition while...

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NSW renewables plan marks a major new moment for climate action in Australia

NSW renewables plan marks a major new moment for climate action in Australia

Renew Economy Ketan Joshi 10 November 2020 – That the states of Australia are stepping well ahead of the federal government on climate action is no mystery. As the Prime Minister Scott Morrison and the federal energy and “emissions reductions” minister Angus Taylor stall, distract and obfuscate, the problems get deeper. Yesterday, federal MP Craig Kelly issued an anxious pre-emptive strike to the federal leadership, presumably after seeing China, South Korea, Japan and (probably) the US get on track to net zero by 2050. “Net zero would cause a lot of pain to a lot of people in a lot of electorates,” Kelly told Guardian Australia, definitely referring to very specific people in very specific electorates. As this unending, self-repeating and utterly exhausting federal pantomime continues, every single state in the country has established a 2050 net zero emissions reduction target, and to varying degrees, each have begun the actual policy and practical steps to create this change on a scale that gets the country where it needs to be in the next few decades. The most fascinating element of this state-level climate action that has spread across the country is the political diversity. The conservative Liberal party leads New South Wales, South Australia and Tasmania. The centre-left Labor party holds the Australian Capital Territory, the Northern Territory, Queensland, Victoria and Western Australia. And, fascinatingly, we do not see a political divide among these states when it comes to hard decisions on climate action. The weird quad-partisan world of state climate politics Yesterday, New South Wales’ state government released a detailed and relatively beefy ‘roadmap‘ for new energy infrastructure over the coming decades. There is plenty to dig into, but it’s important first to note how weird this moment was. This was essentially a climate policy for guiding investment in clean energy that was supported by: – The NSW Liberal party (centre-right) – The NSW Nationals party (hard right) (“The stimulus the Renewable Energy Zones will provide to regional communities will unlock over 9,000 new jobs and will be a huge boost to farmers and land owners”) – The NSW Greens (“This is BIG! 🙌🏽”) Support and interest came from a very wide range of the big climate groups and people in Australia, like the Australian Conservation Foundation, the Climate Council, WWF Australia, The Australia Institute, the Smart Energy Council, Atlassian CEO and renewable investor Mike Cannon-Brookes, Environment Victoria, GetUp!, the Clean Energy Council, Beyond Zero Emissions and quite a few others. It’s a big, endless list. The sole exception to this was One Nation NSW, whose NSW MLC Mark Latham, who said the policy was a “massive scandal of rent seekers, perverted markets and Liberal factional politics”, though One Nation’s recent collapse in QLD polls...

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